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Jan Roëde ( continued )

 

Schermafbeelding 2020-04-28 om 11.00.08One of my personal favourite painters is Jan Roëde. Not very well known outside the Netherlands, but in the Netherlands, he has build a name for himself with frequent gallery and museum exhibitions. One thing I want to share with the readers of this blog is the frequent return of some elements in his paintings. Children, parents and some animals are to be found on his colourful paintings, but the one I like personally most is this “bird he puts in many cases next to his signature.

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It is a typical Roëde element which makes his paintings immediately recognized.  A fun fact, but also a part of the paintings which has the function of an extra signature, because the Roëde bird is one of a kind and no other bird in the world has this shape and can be found in so many colours.

There are some nice Roëde publications available at www.ftn-books.com

 

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Geoffrey Dashwood (1947)

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I had never seen a sculpture by Geoffrey Dashwood before until i saw in an art magazine one of the super birds by Dashwood. At least 4 times as big as a human being and oh so impressive. I must say the sculptures remind me of the ones made in the Netherlands around the 20’s in last century. Specially the bird sculptures by Mendes da Costa have the same way of simplifying as Dashwood does.

But i can understand the attraction of these beautiful sculptures. They are likable and at the same time they have a true artistic quality. By no means these are cheap, affordable sculptures. Since the book that www.ftn-books.com has for sale includes the price list from the Sladmore gallery in 2005. Price range between 5000 and 50.000 ( monumental owl) British Pounds. But certrainly do not hesitate to visit a n exhibition when it is held nearby.

 

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Here is the biography from the Dashwood official site

Geoffrey Dashwood was born in Hampshire, England in 1947. At the age of fifteen he won a scholarship to study fine art at Southampton College of Art, but left after a brief period, preferring to study directly from nature.

He worked in varied occupations to support himself and experimented in various art mediums and techniques in his spare time. His last employment was with the Forestry Commission where he was engaged as a keeper in the New Forest. He also became the unofficial artist in residence for his employers. Dashwood left the Forestry Commission in his mid-twenties to pursue a freelance career in art and he soon received commissions for illustrations and design work, whilst concurrently drawing and painting independently.

In the 1980s Dashwood discovered a gift and a passion for sculpture. His earliest works were small, highly realistic studies in the mainstream of traditional English wildlife art and comparable in style to the famous 19th century French Animalier School of Sculpture. Although these early works brought him commercial success, he became increasingly dissatisfied with the constraints of realism and the lack of personal expression the genre afforded him.

Dashwood started to experiment with larger life-size and monumental works and began to eliminate all superfluous details, creating boldly modeled pieces. He refined his sculptures to attain smooth, tactile, pure forms, further enhanced in bronze by the application of coloured and multi-coloured patinas. In these sculptures he combined his own aesthetic ideals, establishing a distinctive style which is now internationally recognised as being quintessentially Dashwood. His affinity for and empathy with birds and his unique ability to express these emotions to others through his sculpture is undisputed. Dashwood’s work is exhibited and collected worldwide.

 

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Max Beckmann (1884-1950) …a new auction record

A few blogs ago , i argumented that auction records do not justice to the art itself. A record does not automatically mean that the work is of interest or belongs to the best the artist has ever made. But there are of course exceptions. On June 27 Christie’s London  achieved a record for a Max Beckmann painting.   “Hölle der Vögel (Birds’ Hell)” 1937-38 was sold to American art dealer Larry Gagosian for £36,005,000 / $45,834,365 / €40,865,675.

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Beckmann’s “visceral response to the rise of the Nazi regime in his native Germany is one of the most striking and important expressionist paintings ever made, because it comments on the political situation in Germany. He painted the painting in his Amsterdam studio. It is filled with symbols  The nude men scratched and mutilated, youth in the background bringing a Hitler salute and the Hell birds guarding the naked man. If ever there was a comment in art on the rise of Nazi Germany , it is this painting. It was part from an American private collection and probably become part of another private collection again and this is a pity because a work as important as Birds’ Hell should be visible to the public.  Is it worth as much money as now paid for. I don’t think so, …….but what an important painting this is.

Beckmann publications are available at www.ftn-books.com

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André Kertész (1894-1985)… a leporello

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André Kertész is one of the most important and influential photographers from last century. Not only his works cover all important decades from the century, but also his innovative way in seeing and photographing subjects made him famous during his life. One of the special items i have in my inventory is a leporello on the studio of Piet Mondrian. A selection of photographs resembling the classci still lifes of the dutch painters from the golden age. Great photography which proves the quality of these photographs. This leporello is available with other great Kertesz titles at www.ftn-books.com

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Marjolein Bastin (1943)

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This morning i had a discussion with my wife about the qualities of the illustrations by Marjolein Bastin. Is it art?….NO…are these among the best illustrations one  can find on nature and birds….YES. Bastin has become world famous over the years and her works are published all over the world and she even had a Museum presentation in Den Bosch, but this exhibition does not make it art. Specially her series of cards for Hallmark contributed largely to her fame.  Her craftsmanship is without a doubt of the highest quality and her subjects appeal to practically all, but because her works have a feminine touch they therefore mostly appeal to women. For me this is not art as i look at art, but i can respect the meaning of others on this subject. What i personally do like about Bastin’s works is her illustrations for children books. Her VERA series is great to read to young children and fascinating to look at and discover the little details in her drawings. Since i discovered that her works are admired and collected all over the world i started to build a large inventory of her classic publications in my store. So there are many Bastin titles available at

www.ftn-books.com. Please have a look and use for this weekend the discount code BASTIN10 to receive an immediate discount on all your purchases.