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Stephen Buckley (1944)

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I do not know this for certain, but because i could not find many pictures of Stephen Buckley, my guess is he is an introvert perhaps even a shy person and this picture of his character would fit the art that he makes. Large in size and very abstract, but filled with figures that are not very common and certainly not constructivist. There seems to be a mouvement in his paintings, realized by dividing the space , bending the canvas or shifting pannels from each other. This way of setting up the composition and expressing himself makes his paintings very authentic.

For more than forty years Buckley has concerned himself with addressing the major themes of the twentieth century through a personal style oscillating between the matiere of Schwitters, the dandyism of Picabia and the intellectual rigour of Duchamp by deconstruction and reconstruction. Eventually self-reference was inevitable and there is now a large portfolio of themes, references, motifs and symbols which are continually reworked and reinvented. Scale has always been significant from the 20 foot La Manche (1974) to a great number of ‘carry on’ sized works over a period of years.

www.ftn-books.com has a nice Buckley publication available

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Aline Thomassen (1964)

To my knowledge there are only 4 larger publications on Aline Thomassen

  • Mieren rennen onder mijn huid, Maurits van der Laar , 1999
  • The ideal Muslim woman, GEM, 2005
  • Corps fertiles, 2011
  • Cherchez la Femme, Bonnefanten museum, 2014.

It looks as only every 3 or 4 years a larger publication by Aline Thomassen is published

Her subjects in most of her paintings is the female figure and the powers that drive the women in the paintings/watercolors. These woman are unpolished, beautiful and at the same time vulnarable, but also in practically all works they look extremely strong.

The woman depicted are Moroccan woman and perhaps this is why these works intrigue so much. You know the subject looks different, the figure is not familiar nor is their pose. This makes the composition not like the ones of many of Thomassen her contemporaries. In this way Aline Thomassen her works have a signature of their own. Highly recognizable because of the use of her subjects, underlined with arab text and practically in every painting the use of a blood red color which emphasizes, without exception,  the dramatic compositions she realizes in her works.

Aline Thomassen is a great artist.

 

 

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the dutch and het Drinkglas

Look at the Golden age paintings and in many cases a roemer glass is depicted in the painting.

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In later centuries the dutch have become known for their glass designs. Of course there are the glass objects and vases by Meidam and Copier, but i now want to direct your attention to the drinking glasses of Andries Copier . A glass artist/designer who has made one of the most functional and best wine glasses in the world. In the Netherlands this glass is called the Copier GILDE glass and it is stil made by the famous dutch Leerdam glass factory. Schermafbeelding 2019-04-02 om 16.11.18This glass has become a classic over the years and the series has white, red and water glasses. It has become an almost instant classic . From the first days it was made millions and millions of these were sold all over the world. So many of you have a piece of dutch design in their homes without knowing it. A book on HET DRINKGLAS is available at www.ftn-books.com

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Haagse Stijl

What is meant with HAAGSE STIJL? This question was answered with a beautifull exhibitionat the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag in 2004. The book which was published on that occasion was compiled and written by Timo de Rijk and ahs become the ultimate book on the subject. ( available at www.ftn-books.com)

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Haagse Stijl is the period that a typical ART DECO style in Den Haag was developed. There were several furniture producers at that time in Den Haag and Pander was one of them. They made everything from consoles to bookcases and from desks to wast paper baskets.

During the years between the two world wars a luxurious and modern style of design emerged that was termed the ‘Hague School’. The style featured architectural forms, with the straight-sided, Cubist shapes of the furniture directly echoing those of contemporary buildings. Important influences included Berlage’s idealism, traditional arts and crafts, the interiors of Frank Lloyd Wright and the avant-garde ideas of De Stijl. The result was a modern, commercial style of design. Art Deco in The Hague – Interior design in The Hague during the interwar years occupies eleven rooms and shows some of the finest furniture and interiors of this period in The Hague

These golden years of DE HAAGSE STIJL was only a short period , because WWII made an end to most of the producing furniture makings in Den Haag and surroundings, but followthe auction houses closely and you certainly will find objects and furniture from this time slot….a tip the VENDUEHUIS has opened a special location from which their online auctions are directed. This is the spot to find DE HAAGSE STIJL.

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Jean Moral (1906-1999)

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In 1925, the same year André Kértész moved from Hungary, Jean Moral began photographing in Paris.  Like Kértész, his photographs exemplified the inherent aesthetic of Modernism, which by the mid 1920s was in full swing.  Moral’s photographs from 1925 to 1940 depict his eye for graphic abstraction and tight composition.  His personal expression is most apparent in his images of Paris, his intimate portraits of his wife, his self-portraits and the more experimental images he made with photograms and double exposure.


During the 1930s, Moral’s work was included in numerous exhibitions with other photographers including Laura Albin-Guillot, Brassaï, Florence Henri, Horst P. Horst, George Hoyningen-Huene, André Kértész, Francois Kollar, Germaine Krull, Dora Maar, Man Ray and Maurice Tabard.

It is hard to find good publications on Moral but there is one i can really recommend. The year of his deat MARVAL editions published a beautiful monograph on this classic french photographer . The book is available at www.ftn-books.com

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Piet Dirkx weekly

I will follow up with the 1994 invitation card for the Jan Cunen exhibition in which Piet participated.

dirkx cunen

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De Tilburgse Schoool

 

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de Tilburgse School is the tile of a book with text by Geurt Imanse, former curator of the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. De Tilburgse School has proven to be one of the most important new groups of Modern Art painters in the Netherlands.

Who are members of the Tilburgse School?. ..The painters that form this group are :

Marc Mulders, Reinoud van Vught, Guido Geelen, Paul van Dongen, Ronald Zuurmond.

Personally i think Marc Mulders is one of the most gifted painters in the Netherlands and his works always fascinate me, but do not neglect the works from the others…. in many cases they are equally interesting.

What makes these painters stand out? …true craftmanship and the search for new ways in expressing themselves and it shows in the books i have on all these artists at www.ftn-books.com

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Shizuko Yoshikawa | 吉川 静子 | (1934)

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Shizuko Yoshikawa is one of the artists that knows how to build a bridge between architecture and Modern Art. Swiss citizen but Jpanese born Yoshikawa was largely influenced by the ideas of design department of the Hochschule fur Gestaltung in Ulm.

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One of the people who recognized that was the owner of gallery Artline in the Netherlands who held an exhibition in 1986 on Yoshikawa, presenting her color reliefs for the first time in the Netherlands. I wish i had seen her work at that time, Because my knowledge on art has grown over the years. If i now had a chance in aquiring a Yoshikawa work i really would consider to add it to my collection. It is the kind of art that grows on you and is appreciated more and ore over the years. Rooted in the sixties it has a little from everything a bit minimal art, a dash of Zero and perhaps a drop of Kinetic art makes a Yoshikawa work one of a kind.

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Julia Ventura (1952)

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Portuguese born, but working in both Lisbon and Amsterdam her works reflect her surroundings. There was a time in the mid Eighties that her work was widely available in the Netherlands because exhibitions were held at many places in the Netherlands including some renowned museums. But starting in the late Nineties her works were becoming more scarce and less available in the Netherlands. Her focus was no longer on the Netherlands and Portugal alone, but her works were presented in Switzerland, China and Spain too. Later i learned that most of her work is now being sold and available in Portugal itself . Julia Ventura is represented by some well known Portuguese galleries.

In her work, Júlia Ventura explores which role the photo can play in the representation of the self. Her initial work features black and white photos of herself in emotion-filled poses. In later work, in ingenious photos of her fingerprint which she adapts using all kinds of methods and techniques, she focuses on the suggestion of authenticity that emanates from the image.

www.ftn-books.com has one of the first Ventura publications available

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David Redfern (1936-2014)

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David Redfern is best known for his photography of musical performances and musicians.  Here is the biography you can find on his site.

60’s JAZZ

David Redfern’s career began in the twilight jazz clubs of 1960’s London. He risked his one and only camera amongst the jiving teenage crowds. The British Trad boom was under way. His first published photos featured Kenny Ball, Chris Barber, George Melly, and the old Marquee Club.

TV

David began photographing TV Shows like ‘Ready Steady Go’ and ‘Thank Your Lucky Stars’ which were shot during the day. Here he made many of his now classic shots of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and Dusty Springfield.

CLUB NIGHTS

Nights were spent at the 100 Club, Ronnie Scott’s or the Marquee, where he captured on film all the jazz greats from Miles Davis to Ella Fitzgerald.

US DAYS

These pictures were to contribute to what is now the most comprehensive jazz collection in Europe. To break into the commercial world by chasing the big American names, David became a regular visitor to the Jazz festivals in Newport, Antibes and Montreux, and the big rock festivals, photographing such greats as Hendrix and Dylan.

FIRST BOOK

By the 1970’s David had firmly established his name as one of the top music photographers in the business. In 1980 Pete Townsend’s Eel Pie Company published David Redfern’s Jazz Album. Lavishly illustrated with many of David’s finest jazz photographs, it was highly acclaimed by critics and public alike. In the same year, at Frank Sinatras request, David stepped into Terry O’Neill’s shoes as official tour photographer.

EXHIBITIONS

In the late ’80s several exhibitions featured the first 25 years:

  • He showed his work along with Lord Lichfield and Lord Snowdon at the Kodak and Royal Photographic Society’s ‘Living Body’ exhibition. Based on the Channel 4 TV series, it was one of the biggest exhibitions ever held by Kodak.
  • In 1990 he was invited to put on an exhibition in Cuba to coincide with the Jazz Festival there.

NOTTING HILL

At the beginning of 1989 David moved his music picture library REDFERNS to new premises in West London, a location now much favoured by the British music industry. The library expanded rapidly. Covering over 26,000 different artists and styles from every musical genre, and representing some 500 photographers and collections, it became the most comprehensive music picture library in the world, with over 205,000 items online.

Redfern is without a doubt a great photographer, artistically he is not the greatest of all his contemporaries, but his photographs are a historical document and must be admired by all who love music. Deavid Redfern books can be found at www.ftn-books.com

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