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Marie Hanlon (1948)

 

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Sometimes you must consider yourself very lucky. I have been writing on art and artists for almost 5 years now and during this period I have written blogs on many known and lesser-known artists. In the meantime selecting with these blogs those publications that are available through FTN-Books. In this way promoting the art, books and publications I am selling.

It must have been a month ago that I received an email by an artist I did not know. She introduced herself, spoke of the great selection of books I am selling and wanted very much to introduce her works. Her name …MARIE HANLON…. and she asked if I would like to take a look at her site….and so I did.

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I am always intrigued by artists who I do not know, so I searched for her on the internet and found that she makes the kind of art I am fond of. It is a mix between minimal, constructivist, hard edge and even surrealistic art at some times. We wrote and agreed that it would be nice to make her works known with the help of the ftn-books.com site and ftn blogs and now I am proud to announce that her publications are available at http://www.ftn-books.com and that she made an artist selection of 4 drawings that are exclusively available through FTN ART at special introductory prices.

 

In future blogs, new material will be proposed to my readers, but in the meantime here is a short biography on Marie and the link to her site so you can find out yourself why I was fascinated by her work. https://www.mariehanlon.com/

and for information on the books and art by Marie Hanlon please contact me at ftnbooksandart@gmail.com

Marie was born in Kilkenny and studied History of European Painting and English at University College Dublin, at the National College of Art & Design/Dublin and has worked as a professional artist since 1990.

Known mainly as an abstract artist of finely made small and medium-sized works, Marie’s output in recent years encompasses a broader range of media. Through her collaboration with contemporary composers, she has developed new work, especially in video and installation.

 

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Oey Tjeng Sit (1917-1987)

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I thought i had, but i just discovered that i had not written a blog on Oey Tjeng Sit before and there is now every reason to write a blog on this self taught artist, because i recently added a wonderful multiple to the collection of http://www.ftn-books.com. It is the Loerakker multiple on the occasion of the presentation of the monograph on the artist.

Amsterdam based pharmacist-artist Oey Tjeng Sit (1917-1987) invited visitors of an art fair to throw paper balls toward tin cans, decided to set fire to cages filled with balls of newspapers, or to fill warehouses with the same second hand paper material. He liked to add bizar titles to his works such as ‘Bicycling against the wind one might forget the invention of the wheel’, ‘An artist who is fashionable is a victim of good taste’ or ‘The only thing I know is that I trust blindly a feeling that promises me secrets.’
Oey Tjeng Sit, whose name means Yellow Clear Solid was born in Purwokerto (Java) at the foot of the Klud Volcano, that erupted just at the time of Oey’s birth. Born in the Year of the Dragon he found himself released of the duty to take care of his parents; that is why – after visiting high school in Bandung – he traveled to the Netherlands in 1938 in order to study pharmacy. Twenty years later he opened Apotheek Oey (Oey Pharmacy) at the Prinsengracht opposite the Anne Frank House. He took away the pills and potions out of the window display and started a small art gallery there. One of his nicknames was a ‘Dragon Man with a Dada Passion’ who showed the art work of colleagues and friends which gave him another epitheton: ‘the nestor of Amsterdam window art’. Oey’s work as an autodidact is characterized by a wide artistic range of disciplines: after a period of surrealistic drawings and paintings he started making wood and linoleum cuts, collages, assemblages and editing books through his own editorial ‘The Finger Press’.
In his collages, often together with Chinese ink and brush, as well as in his installations he used frequently news papers, of which he wanted to extend their short life, tied as they are to daily actuality. The newspaper was a source for many questions for Oey ‘Can we measure the weight of printed news?’ and ‘What contains more wood than newspaper letters?’ ‘If there is an order, then is it a temporary one.’

Oeys oeuvre – light-hearted, playful with a subtle feeling for the hidden esthetic quality of daily life – can be a long lasting confirmation of these words.

Beside the multiple i have more collectable books by the artist in my inventory

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Lawrence Weiner at Konrad Fischer, 1989

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Readers of this blog know of my admiration for Lawrence Weiner and this is the reason i want to share this very special invitation that i recently added to my inventory. It is the invitation for the Weiner exhibition from 1989 at Konrad Fischer . The invitation by the artist is a piece of art by itself. Making this a true collectable multiple by the artist.

WEINER HYDRO A

weiner hydro b

weiner hydro c

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Günter Wintgens (1951)

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Not much information to be found on Günter Wintgens, but still he has had quite a few exhibitions all over Europe according to his biography and now is selling on Saatchi art.

Picture planes in Günter Wintgens’s work Pictorial motifs with diaphanous planes form a central aspect of Günter Wintgens’s work. Their optical transparency, intuiting or understanding the partially concealed planes, plays with visitors’ curiosity. It allows them to recognize several pictorial planes at once. Hence, they perceive the amount of time that has passed from one stage of the creative process to the next, and are able to guess, to a certain extent, the history behind the creation of this picture. For the fragmented motifs, made up of countless, particle-like brushstrokes across a mono- or polychromatic ground, the passage of time is also an important aspect. Although it also applies to the process of creating the painting, it is mainly true of the element of instability—the apparent motion evoked by the painting’s shimmering texture, and often reinforced by its format, the tondo. Also important is the aspect of communicating information. Each bit is legible by itself, but because the individual planes of information are assembled and layered on top of each other, visitors are offered a new, conceptual projection surface. Yet another aspect is clearly of a spiritual nature: the constantly recurring question about the real essence of things. Behind a veil both delicate and tear-resistant, the answer to this question stoutly resists comprehension.

www.ftn-books.com has an early Wintgens catalogue available

wintgens

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New Business Card FTN books & Art

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Some recent changes made it necessary to translate these changes into a new business card. The most important one being two new email addresses. One personal one and the other for the FTN books & Art contacts. So here is all the new business information to contact me and keep track of my activities, the daily blog and additions to my inventory.

Wilfried van den Elshout / FTN books

Veursestraatweg 106c

2265CG Leidschendam,  the Netherlands

www.ftn-books.com

www.ftn-blog.com

new email : wilfriedvandenelshout@gmail.com

new email : ftnbooksandart@gmail.com

 

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Paul Wunderlich (1927-2010)

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Paul Wunderlich can be considered as a second generation surreal painter/sculptor. First there was the generation of magritte and Dali who were recognized as being important. This generation was followed by artists who stayed true to Surrealism for their entire artist careers. Labisse, Fuchs, Tanguy and ….Paul Wunderlich . The artist for who the human figure was the start of many art work. He specially was fond of the male figure, which he used on many occasions in his art, but that was not the first art work by Wunderlich i encountered. I know exactly what and where it was. Somewhere in the early Seventies a newspaper article was published and in the article the NIKE sculpture by Wunderlich was mentioned. I learned who sold it and hoped to acquire it for my staring collection, because its edition size was large ( 1000 copies). It was not to be….visiting the gallery Steltman who exhibited and sold the sculpture i learned that the price was 1100 guilders. A price far too steep for me…so i dit not buy it. A few years later my parents decided to buy it together with another Wunderlich sculpture which is now still in my collection.

My sister has the NIKE statue. Both statues/sculptures still grace our living rooms. Wunderlich is perhaps not the most fashionable artist to have in your collection, but i can guarantee you that his works will grow on you.

http://www.ftn-books.com has some nice Wunderlich publications available .

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Menno Bauer (1949)

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Here is the text that can be found on the Menno Bauer web site. It explains the works and methods Bauer uses.

Menno Bauer is interested in the movements of dancers. “In my paintings”, says Bauer, ‘I set everything in motion. I want the figures in the painting to dance. I want to show that everything is alive and infused with tension. In fact, I am also dusting off images that already exist. He is not only inspired by Van Maanen’s ballets, but also by famous historic paintings. They too contain scenes into which Bauer breathes new life. His reasoning is simple. In a painting, everything is still, motionless, because it is all painted. Nonetheless, you can in stil the suggestion of motion. The challenge is to make that illusion convincing.
It should be said that Menno Bauer does not work in a realistic style. Against a background of broad planes of colour- an agressive red versus a friendly green -, his figures, loosely contoured in black, dance, walk and fall, imprisoned in a world of their own. Here, just as in a filmclip of Johan Cruyff slowly flying past, its utterly unclear just what these people are doing or where they are.
In Menno Bauer’s eyes, the figures inhabiting the sometimes renowned paintings that he uses as his starting points are the theatrical performers acting out their roles. The undefined space in wich they find themselves is hence their stage, a place that can be altered into all manner of environments by way of changing the decors. The actors that Bauer employs in his paintings are professionals in the art of overstatement. Cheer or drama are applied in thick layers, out to persuade their audience. Moreover, what these characters are acting out is not real. Bauer finds excitement in making use of this exaggeration, these emphatic, acted-out gestures, in order to approach the illusion of real gesture or movement.

bauer zweet

 

There is one Bauer publication available at www.ftn-books.com

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The “Observatorium” by Robert Morris ( 1931-2018)

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Just last year Robert Morris died at the age of 87 and because of a folder i found on his Observatory in the Netherlands, this folder reminded me of his importance for Modern and Minimal art. Robert Morris had a special connection with the Netherlands and during his life he made some iconic land Art projects on this country. One of these projects was the ” OBSERVATORIUM” at a town called Lelystad. The best is can do now is show you how impressive and “beautiful this project still is:

 

there are some very nice Robert Morris publications available at www.ftn-books.com

 

 

 

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Joachim Grommek (1957)

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Joachim Grommek, Master of Arts of Free Art/ Film at HBK Braunschweig (Professor: Malte Sartorius), Germany, in 1982 has mainly shown in German and European institutions and galleries since 1987, among them important solo shows like “Malerei 300” at the Städtische Galerie Wolfsburg, Wolfsburg, Germany in 2011. His geometric-abstract, illusionary work in perfection lays varies the topic of authentic image and copy like the ancient Trompe-l’œils, always asking for a second look. Grommek’s work though is reflecting art history and prominent artists like Kasimir Malewitsch, Piet Mondrian, Blinky Palermo or Robert Ryman.

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This is how the Taubert gallery describes the works by Joachim Grommek. They have a nice selection in stock. This blog on Grommek is written on the occasion of the purchase for FTN-art of a beautiful impressive diamond shaped work : STAR IV, 2006 (Black Diamond). You really have to study his works from very close up. It appears these are not tapes nor raw chipped wood material, but literally everything….lines , wood, tapes …is painted. Materials used, acrylic paint, lack, wood , special paints…the result a fascinating work of art that impresses with its composition, but in the meantime is a technical painters masterpiece.

The works by Grommek can be found in numerous German museums and ao. the Centraal Museum / Utrecht

here is the text from the book TILT:

Grommek’s pictures have an extraordinarily immediate visual presence, despite their comparatively small size. Whereas they seem rigorously minimalistic in terms of both areal composition and chromatic clarity, there is still something provisional and unfinished about them. More like tantalising intermediates, they seem to imply that the artist has not yet decided which area should be superimposed on which. Patches of bald fibreboard are visible in places, as are strips of adhesive tape.

But nothing is what it seems in these works. Although Grommek does indeed use standard industrially laminated fibreboard as a ground, the grey-brown speckled areas that the viewer takes for unpainted fibreboard turn out to be no less painted albeit with deceptive verisimi|itude -than all the other areas. Even the brightly coloured transparent »adhesive tape« turns out to be lacquer which, perfectly applied layer upon layer, creates the illusion of overlapping strips of plastic tape. An abstract, »unrepresentational« picture by Grommek, therefore, is actually the result of a highly representational style of painting, with what it represents being its own materiality.

Once the temptation to tear off the strips of non-exlstent adhesive tape has been resisted, the viewer can step back a few paces and in doing so go back to the beginning and to the play of shapes and colours. The tension remains, just as the contradictions between the reality seen, painted and represented remain unresolved.
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Sergei Lobanov (1887-1943)

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This is one of those artists that stayed out of sight for me because i never had seen his work in a museum before, but after i found a book ( available at http://www.ftn-books.com) it became clear to me that his implressionist art is not less than the the works by his french  and european counterparts.

Sergey Ivanovich Lobanov was one of the significant but little known artists of the first half of the 20th century. His fauvist landscapes participated in exhibitions of the Jack of Diamonds in 1910 and 1912. Unfortunately, Sergey Lobanov’s works were hardly displayed hereafter but for few exhibitions in the 1920s.
<divSergey Lobanov studied in art studios of F.I. Rerberg (1906) and I.I. Mashkov (1907), at the Moscow School for Painting, Sculpture and Architecture (1907-1913). As a school student yet, he got interested in the history of fine arts. Sergey Lobanov attended courses on the history of arts at the Moscow Archaeological Institute in 1914.

He became an official of the Museum and Monument Protection Department of the People’s Commissariat for Education in 1918. Sergey Lobanov was seated the custodian of the nationalized collection of S. I. Schukin in 1922. For one and a half decades the artist was the deputy director of the State Museum of New Western Art (later a considerable part of the museum collection was shifted to the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts and made the basis of the collection of French painting of the second half of the 19th and 20th centuries).

After his short membership in the Artists Association of Revolutionary Russia he was excluded from it as being “alien to ideology of the Association” in 1924 and walked off from any art groups.

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