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Op Losse Schroeven by Wim Crouwel

Yesterdays blog was on the “OP LOSSE SCHROEVEN” exhibition. A breathtraking and important exhibition on Conceptual Art at the Stedelijk Museum. Poster and catalogue design by Wim Crouwel and while preparing the blog i found a page in the book  IN AND OUT of AMSTERDAM ( also available at www.ftn-books.com ) which explains the story of the exhibition and even mentiones the poster by Wim Crouwel.

Here is the page from the book:

schroeven in and out

 

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Stedelijk Museum…Op losse schroeven, 1969

Another iconic exhibition for the Stedelijk Museum was the ” OP LOSSE SCHROEVEN” exhibition.

It was one of the experimental exhibitions in the Sixties which made the Stedelijk Museum being recognized as one of the most important modern art museum in the world.

I recently purchased another small set of WIM CROUWEL designed posters for the Stedelijk Museum and i will now have the oppertunity to present the combination of the poster with catalogue is this blog. The first…..OP LOSSE SCHROEVEN from 1969. Perhaps this is one of the rarest of them all. ( both available at www.ftn-books.com )

 

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Les Belles Endormies (2014)

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Les Belles Endormies / Sleeping Beauties is one of those exhibitions i wished i had seen at the Museum.

It was held at the LE MUSEE BONNARD in 2014 and its catalogue shows all of the magnificent paintings that were present in this exhibition. The Theme….sleeping woman. From almost real and raw up to dreamlike and abstract. What struck me was that most of these women were totally at ease and not aware of the presence of the painter. Excepet for the Gauguin contribution. The woman lyingon a bed is not sleeping. eyes half open she is looking at the artist.

sleeping hh

It is a truly great collection which has been collected for this exhibition by the curators and i wish i had known of it before. It would have been the perfect reason to visit the Bonnard Museum.

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Gerrit Veenhuizen (1925-2015)

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The art of Gerrit Veenhuizen takes decades to discover and the same time to grow on you.

I first discovered the work by Veenhuizen , when Hans Locher introduced the painter to us and organized an exhibition with the artist. A large book was published with the exhibition, knowing that it would not sell but because of the promotion by Locher a beautiful book was published. It still can be bought at reasonable prices, but more important it was my first introduction to the work by Veenhuizen and at first i was not such a fan. I think his worlds were too much a language already discovered by Heyboer.

But as said…. it takes decades to grow on you and now i finally see the quality of how his works were ahead of his time. Educated by Campendonck he developed soon a style of his own and stayed true to this style, creating a world with typical symbols and figures who populated his works. He is but could also have been achild of Heyboer and Klee.

http://www.ftn-books.com has some Veenhuizen publications available including the scarce galerie 20 catalogue from 1961.

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Horst Antes (1936)

 

Schermafbeelding 2021-05-04 om 15.04.17I never had many titles on Horst Antes until i recently bought a small collections from the heirs of gallery d’Eendt.

galerie d’Eendt has had many exhibitions with works by Horst Antes and published some great graphic works by the artist over a period of over 20 years. Personally i would say his works are not “My cup of tea”, but…..undoubtedly his work is original and so typically Seventies that it has become important and shows the way art was developing. On one side there is complete abstraction with MINIMALISM and on the other side there is dreamy almost abstract characters who populate paintings and present a world completely different from the real world. In the Netherland i consider Jan Snoeck to be part of this movement of artist and when you look at both these artists their works , you see why i think these are artistically related.

Horst Antes (born 28 October 1936 Heppenheim, Germany) is a German artist and sculptor.

After his Abitur, he studied from 1957 to 1959 under the important woodcutter HAP Grieshaber at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste (today known as the Staatliche Akademie der Bildenden Künste Karlsruhe) in Karlsruhe. In 1959, the artist’s work was honoured with two prizes, art prize of the city of Hanover and the Pankofer prize on the occasion of the German Youth Art prize.

In his early paintings, Antes sought a path somewhere between figurative painting and the L’Art Informel. One of his most important role models was Willem de Kooning. Around 1960 Antes discovered his ‘Kopffüßler’ (literal translation: Head-Footer), a form which preoccupied the artist in numerous variations and artistic techniques. By 1963 his ‘Kopffüßler’ was fully developed in its stylistic and contextual premises and became also compulsory for his sculptural work, which began the same year.[1] The artist was given several scholarships and awards in the 1960s, including the Villa-Romana-Prize in Florence in 1962 and the Villa Massimo scholarship in Rome in 1963. Three years later, aged only 29, Antes accepted a teaching post at the Akademie in Karlsruhe. This was followed by a post as a professor also in Karlsruhe which he held from 1967 to 1973, as well as a one-year guest-professorship at the Staatliche Hochschule für Bildende Künste in Berlin. The artist resumed teaching at the Akademie in Karlsruhe in 1984 and continued teaching there for another 16 years. The regional capital awarded him the Hans-Molfenter-prize in 1989.

Since 1990 Antes has been living and working in Karlsruhe, Florence and Berlin. His oeuvre includes not only paintings and graphic art, but also sculptures in public spaces. His works are exhibited throughout the world and are represented in all the most important German collections, et al. at the Kunsthall Hamburg, the Museum Ludwig in Cologne, the Nationalgalerie Berlin, and the Museum of Modern Art.

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Romano Frea (1945)

frea portret

An artist who had no connection in the Netherlands was known by Will Hoogstraate from gallery d’Eendt , but according to my information had no exhibitions at this gallery, but……. just look at the similarities with Will Leewens . Here is a work by Will Leewens (on the right) from roughly the same period. (Frea on the left)

Artist who worked over 1500 km apart from each other and were progressing and developing their works into the same world of abstraction. I still find this fascinating to discover and see that artists , working apart from eachother and probably not knowing the other person, are developing their art into the same direction.

I recently added two scarce Frea publications to my inventory. Both are still available at www.ftn-books.com

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Susana Solano (1946)

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Susana Solano’s creative structure has taken shape all throughout her career like one of the metallic meshes that are a constant feature of her works. It has shaped a map of communicating vessels in which material, space, senses and life experience make up a fluid continuum. Susana Solano’s works, regardless of the materials used and their size, correspond to an underlying idea of witnessing existence through its materialization as a memory of her emotional relationships with spaces, shapes and people. For this reason, every sculpture absorbs and expresses personal experiences that radiate out over the setting and transform them, as if it were a cosmic game.

Jack Shainman Gallery, West 20th St Susana Solano A Meitat De Cami-Halfway There-1My ideal space is a unique space, empty of stories, with which I could fall in love. A space unknown to me, an atmosphere of thought. I want now to concentrate on a life in which there is nothing and to work with the minimum possible.

–       Solano, Susana. Susana Solano: Dibuixos, Escultures, Fotografies, Instal·lacions : Muecas. Barcelona: Museu D’Art Contemporani De Barcelona, 1999.

Solano is best known for her abstract sculptures made from a range of materials that includes iron, steel, lead, glass, rattan and wire mesh. She belongs to a generation of pioneering female sculptors who expanded a realm conventionally dominated by men. Within the traditions of post-minimalism, Solano’s work conveys a connection to personal memory, domestic space, and the natural world. With the artist’s hand leaving traces of her process, the rigidity of the materials is counterbalanced with the personal. Her approach is one that channels architectural forms and consideration of space with a delicate quality that balances the natural and the industrial.

Susana Solano lives and works in Barcelona. Her group exhibitions include Skulptur Projekte Münster and Documenta 8 in Kassel, Germany (1987), São Paulo Biennial (1987), the Spanish Pavilion at the Venice Biennale (1988), the Carnegie International (1988), and the Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid (2007). She has also had solo exhibitions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. (1989-90), the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1991), the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid (1992 and 2003), Whitechapel Gallery, London (1993), the Museu d’art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) (1999), and Museo Casa de la Moneda, Madrid (2012-13). Her work is included in numerous public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Museum moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien, Vienna; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, among others.

www.ftn-books.com has one Solano title avaialble.

susana solano

 

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Bernd Zimmer (1948)

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I have been following the careeer of Bernd Zimmer from the time he had his first exhibition at the Groninger Museum in 1982( catalogue available at ww.ftn-boooks.com). At that time i had a great interest in Zimmer and his fellow artists Elvira Bach and Rainer Fetting, but somehow, after a few years, i lost interest in these artist, but lately works are appearing at auction and sometimes at very reasonable prices. So maybe now is the right time to renew my interest in Zimmer and his friends from the NEUE WILDEN group.

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Bernd Zimmer is a contemporary German artist. Often discussed as representative of the Neue Wilde group, Zimmer’s paintings are characterized by their monochromatic palettes—primarily greens, yellows, and chartreuse—and recurring imagery of abstracted nature created through poured and splattered paint. Zimmer’s work is influenced by his extensive global travels, spanning numerous countries on five of the seven continents. Born on November 6, 1948 in Planegg, Germany, the artist has enjoyed widespread acclaim for his work, including exhibitions at institutions such as the H2 Center for Contemporary Art in Augsburg, Germany, The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and The Berlin Gallery.

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Paule Vézelay (1892-1984)

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Paule Vezelay was  recognized for her art in the last stage of her career and is not that knoewn an artist. Still the TATE organized a retrospective in 1983 . Not many publications have been published during her life, but some small publications are still to be found on the internet. One is availabel at http://www.ftn-books.com.

the following text comes from Wikipedia:

Vézelay was born Marjorie Watson-Williams in Bristol, a daughter of the pioneering ENT surgeon, Patrick Watson-Williams (1863-1938). Before the First World War she trained for a short period at the Slade School of Fine Art and then at the London School of Art. She first gained recognition as a figurative painter, had her first London show in 1921 and was invited to join the London Group in 1922. She moved to France in 1926 and changed her name to Paule Vézelay possibly to identify herself with the School of Paris. In 1928 she abandoned figurative painting and made her first abstract work (which is now lost) and from then on worked exclusively in an abstract mode. In 1929 she met André Masson whom she fell in love and lived with for four years. Working side by side, they both painted dreamlike surrealist works.[2] Vezelay became well respected in modernist Parisian art circles and was elected in the 1930s to membership of the French abstract movement, Abstraction-Création, which was largely established as a reaction to Surrealism.

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On the outbreak of the Second World War Vézelay moved back to London, but had difficulty in gaining recognition from the British art establishment, possibly because of her identification with Paris at a time when the London art world was beginning to acquire its own separate and different reputation. However, in 1952 she was invited by Andre Bloc, president of the Parisian constructivist abstract movement Groupe Espace, to form a London branch of that movement. After many difficulties and the refusal of some leading British abstract artists to join (including Victor Pasmore), she was successful in forming a small group of painters, sculptors and architects who held an exhibition in the Royal Festival Hall in 1955 which anticipated many elements of the much better known 1956 Whitechapel Gallery exhibition, This is Tomorrow. In the 1950s she made textile designs for Metz of Amsterdam and Heals of London. In many of her works, Vézelay’s abstract imagery, such as floating quasi-biomorphic shapes, was outside the main characteristics of the constructivist approach. She had a lifelong aim of creating works which were “pleasing and happy” – not terms generally associated with Constructivism. However, her view that ‘pure’ abstract art enhanced the environment, and her involvement with Groupe Espace in the 1950s which promoted the concept of a synthesis (or close collaboration) between architects and abstract painters and sculptors, place her at least in part within the Constructivist tradition. Her post-war textile designs for Heals also place her firmly within the 20th century Modern Movement.

The Tate gave Vézelay a retrospective exhibition in 1983 – a late recognition of the quality of her work and her significant place in art history as one of the first British artists to embark on a lifetime exploration and development of abstraction.

Paule Vézelay was also included in Pallant House Radical Women exhibition, focusing on the works of Jessica Dismorr and her contemporaries, in early 2020.

paule vezelay

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Anthon Beeke (continued)

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Here is a tip by a very good friend I received yesterday. It shows that it is impossible to keep track of every exhibition, but this is well worth mentioning in a blog, since the subject is one of the greatest of dutch graphic designers from the last 50 years. It concerns the library of Anthon Beeke.

The library of Anthon Beeke

Get lost in the books of graphic designer Anthon Beeke.

The exhibition space above the Social Label Lab is a temporary library with bookcases full of books arranged around themes such as graphic design, culture, photography, typography, jazz, eroticism and just plain fun. Playful, naughty and challenging. On entering the Werkwarenhuis, you are given white gloves to browse through the enormous collection of books at your leisure. In silos, you can retreat to your own reading table with a twilight lamp. Anthon Beeke was a graphic designer and designed posters for Toneelgroep Amsterdam, Kunstrai and the Centraal Museum, among others. Lidewij Edelkoort, Anthon Beeke’s life partner, wants his collection and his love for books to be shared with the whole country. His books tell the story of him as a long-time collector of books that inspired, relaxed or transported him. Together with co-curator Charlotte Grün (Studio OOK), she put together this exhibition. A collection of books tells different stories about its collector, through the layers of information that cross each other. More and more information can be found on the Internet, which is why more and more people are rigorously getting rid of their book collections. This also applies to well-known creative Dutchmen.

“We are proud that after the van Abbe Huis in Eindhoven, we can now show this special intimate exhibition in our Werkwarenhuis.” Petra Janssen and Edwin Vollebergh of Studio Boot have themselves taught with Anthon for years at the Design Academy. They know how he looked, inspired and shared his knowledge with the students. “By showing these books in the work shop, you can get a glimpse of his world through his eyes again. But each time through a different lens.”

More Anthon Beeke > 01.02.2015 / 06.12.2018 / 02.12.2020

Exhibition the library of Anthon Beeke
Werkwarenhuis, ‘s-HertogenBosch
9 June -28 Aug, 2021
werkwarenhuis.nl

of course ww.ftn-books.com has many items by Beek in its inventory