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Imre Reiner (1900-1987)

 

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Imre Reiner is most known for his typograohic innovations and fonts, but recently i added a book on his Ziffernbilder to my inventory. It shows that he was beside as typographic artist a very talented graphic artist too.

Born August 18, 1900 in Versec (Hungary), died August 21, 1987 in Lugano. Staatliche Bildhauerschule Zalatua (Zalatua State Sculpture School) and Kunstgewerbeschule Frankfurt (Frankfurt School of Arts and Crafts), from 1921 Kunstgewerbeschule (School of Arts and Crafts) in Stuttgart (Prof. F. H. Ernst Schneidler).

1923 to 1925 – worked as a graphic designer in London, Paris, New York and Chicago. Until 1927 – master-class student of F. H. Ernst Schneidler. From 1931 worked in Ruvigliana near Lugano as painter, graphic designer and illustrator.

Fonts: Meridian (1930), Gotika (1933), Corvinus (1934–35), (1938), Symphonie (1938), Floride (1939), Reiner Script (1951), Contact (1952), Reiner Black (1955), Mustang (1956), Bazar (1956), London Script (1957), (1957), (1959).

Matura, Mercurius Script and Pepita are trademarks of Monotype Typography.

the book below is available at www.ftn-books.com

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Erwin Heerich (1922-2004)

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The following text comes from Wikipedia. I did not know the artist but i was impressed with a publication that was published in the Sixties with the van Abbemuseum exhibition.  This publication is now availabel at www.ftn-books.com

From 1945 to 1950 Heerich studied fine arts at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf under Ewald Mataré. From 1950 to 1954, he belonged, together with Joseph Beuys, to the master class of his professor. At that time, he chiefly produced sculptures representing animals and drawings of plants. In 1954, he left the Düsseldorf academy and worked as an artist and art teacher. Since 1959, he used cardboard as his artistic material. He presented 10 of these “Kartonplastiken” at the documenta IV (1968) in Kassel.

Heerich emphasized that for him, “cardboard, like polystyrene, had no specifically aesthetic or historical connotations, the materials are value-neutral to the largest possible extent.” Furthermore, the artist was not primarily “concerned with the manifestation of an art object, but with making an idea material in terms of a specific problem: how space can be presented and formed.”

From 1969 to 1988 he was a professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. In 1974 he became also a member of the Academy of Arts, Berlin.

From 1982 to 1994 he created eleven exhibition pavilions for the Museum Insel Hombroich, which were called “chapels in the landscape”. His elemental sculptures became the design base for these gallery pavilions.

In 1978 Heerich received the Will Grohmann Prize in Berlin. In 1987 he received the Max Beckmann Prize in Frankfurt am Main and in 1995 the Anton Stankowski Prize in Stuttgart.

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Jean Widmer (1929)

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Yesterdays blog and the acquisition of some former Ben Bos library books on grapphic design inspired me to find some more information on Jean Widmer.

Jean Widmer is an acclaimed Swiss graphic designer too based in France.

From 1946 to 1950 he studied at the Kunstgewerbeschule (School of Arts and Crafts) of Zurich, then directed by the former Bauhaus master Johannes Itten (1888-1967). In 1953 he moved to Paris, where attended lithography courses at the École des Beaux-Arts (School of Fine Arts).

After one-year internship at the Atelier Tolmer, located on the Île Saint-Louis, he was appointed Art Director of SNIP—Société Nouvelle d’Information et de Publicité (New Society of Information and Advertising), holding this charge from 1956 to 1959. He later moved to Galeries Lafayettes, a major department store, substituting Peter Knapp as its Art Director, from 1959 to 1961. At the same time he also worked at Jardin des Modes magazine as art director and photographer, holding the position until 1969. During the 1960s he also travelled in Japan to study ‘shodo,’ Japanese calligraphy, and ‘mon,’ Japanese traditional crests.

In 1969 he opened Visuel Design, focusing on coordinated graphic communication for cultural and public institutions. The same year he was the first designer to develop a corporate identity system for a French cultural institution, developing the graphic communication of the CCI—Centre de Création Industrielle (Center of Industrial Creation).

It was during this period that Widmer developed his own original graphic language, based on synthesis, rigorous geometry, and schematic typography that to this day represents the first and one of the few examples of Modern graphic design in France.

In 1972 he took charge of the first design for the French Highways signage, drawing a beautiful and effective pictogram system. From 1974 to 1977, and again in 1985, he designed the coordinated identity for the Centre Georges Pompidou, formed from the merging of the CCI with other cultural institutions, for which he designed a beautiful and iconic mark that portrays the famous façade of the building.

In 1979 he designed an acclaimed poster for Kieler Woche, the major sailing event in the world that is famous in the world of graphic design for its striking communication. From 1983 to 1987 he worked on the corporate identity design for the prestigious Musée d’Orsay, in collaboration with the prominent graphic designer Bruno Monguzzi.

He continued to focus on corporate graphics for cultural institutions, developing the identity for the Théâtre National de la Colline, and the IMA—Institut du Monde Arab, both in 1987, and the Bibliothèque Nationale de France in 1994. In 1989 he also designed a typefaces, Bi-89, on the occasion of the French Revolution’s bicentennial.

In 1960 he joined the faculty of the ENSAD—École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs (School of Decorative Arts), Paris, where he taught until 2000 remodeling the graphic design curriculum, stressing mastery of typography and color as fundamental skills. Since the early 1990s, he also taught at the Atelier National de Recherché Typographique (National Bureau for Typographic Research).

During his career he received important recognitions, including the Toulouse-Lautrec Prize in 1980, the Grand Prix National des Arts Graphiques from the French Ministry of Culture in 1994, and the Distinctive Merit Award from the ADC (Art Directors Club), New York. He was appointed Chevalier of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 1983, Officer of the same order in 1991, and Commandeur in 2001.

The important Centre Georges Pompidou publication is now available at www.ftn-books.com

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Uwe Loesch (1943)

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I did not realize that many of the posters for the Ruhrlandmuseum in Essen were designed by Uwe Loesch. For me Loesch has the same graphic qualities as i find with the designs by Wim Crouwel. His  posters are of a rare quality, inventive and timeless.

 

www.ftn-books.com has two three Loesch publications and send to Ben Bos former founding member of Total design

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Posters by Willem Sandberg and Wim Crouwel…part 7

It is not the catalogue which steals the show, but certainly the poster designed by Wim Crouwel does.

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Another iconic duo . Both designed by Wim Crouwel, but the poster is something really special which features in many publication on poster and graphic design. Bot are available at www.ftn-books.com

 

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Co Westerik (1924)

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One of the last grand “old” masters of the dutch Art scene. Of course C ( Jacobus) Westerik has had his exhibitions abroad, but beside the Netherlands, germany and Belgium his name is not that well known. I met Westerik at the time he was making the portrait of Theo van Velzen. One of the former directors of the Haags Gemeentemuseum. The portrait was presented as a farewell present when van Velzen resigned to be hung in a gallery with portraits of other former directors. A small portrait which he managed to squeeze in and complete it in between 2 other paintings. His canvasses are not too big , but they are scarce because Westerik has a very small production yearly. I really do not know if he still is active as a painter, but at the time the van Velzen portrait was made , his production was 3 paintings a year. All were sold up front to collectors and museums. Among them Frits Becht (1930-2006) .He was the private collector with the largest Westerik collection .

He who was a personal friend for his entire life and followed his career through the years and bought many works. beside a painter Westerik was also known for his graphics in which he excelled. His production as a graphic artist was much much larger and there are almost a thousand different prints known by him. Westerik is a very important artist for dutch art and because i followed him over the years www.ftn-books.com has many publications on Westerik available.

A short documentary on Westerik can be found at this address: http://hollandsemeesters.info/posts/show/7738