Posted on Leave a comment

Dorothea Tanning and Max Ernst (7)

Schermafbeelding 2020-08-27 om 18.29.28

Following a relationship with art patron Peggy Guggenheim, Max Ernst went on to marry his fourth wife, Dorothea Tanning. The couple – who famously fell in love over a game of chess – is credited as pioneering the Surrealist movement. Despite this successful accomplishment, Manning insisted that the two “Never, never talked art. Never.” Married in a double ceremony in Hollywood with Man Ray and Juliet Browner, the pair enjoyed surrounding themselves with other artists. Often, they would entertain the likes of Henri Cartier-Bresson in their home in France, seemingly thriving among fellow creatives. Dipping between Surrealism, Dadaism and everything in between, the pair continued their separate artistic practices and maintained a healthy marriage until Ernst’s death in 1976.

There are several Max Ernst publications available at www.ftn-books.com

Posted on Leave a comment

Man Ray and Lee Miller (5)

Schermafbeelding 2020-08-25 om 15.27.30

Although Man Ray insisted that he didn’t take student apprentices, the successful model Lee Miller relocated to Paris for a chance at working with the iconic artist. She became his photographic assistant, his muse and, later, his lover. The romance was short and sweet, but the two-year relationship was a productive one. Before finding herself as a photographer and becoming an active member of the Surrealist movement, Miller discovered the solarisation technique Man Ray would later trademark. She is also credited for many of the artist’s photographs taken between 1929 and 1932, as she stepped in while he worked on his paintings.

The following titles are available at www.ftn-books.com

Posted on Leave a comment

Gilbert & George (3)

Schermafbeelding 2020-08-24 om 16.32.13

Gilbert Proesch and George Passmore

Just like a scene from your favourite rom-com, Gilbert and George first locked eyes in the halls of Central Saint Martins in 1967, where the two studied sculpture. Dubbing the encounter as love at first sight, the duo collaborated on both 3D as well as 2D works – although they would continue to refer to all artworks as sculpture. Exploring themes of religion, sexuality and identity across a wide range of media, Gilbert and George have stayed relevant beyond the confines of the elitist art. They married in 2008, having spent over 4 decades together in the art world that they collectively rebel against.

www.ftn-books.com has many Gilbert & George titles available

Posted on Leave a comment

Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo (2)

Schermafbeelding 2020-08-24 om 16.11.23

With a love story as colourful as their shared aesthetic, Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo’s relationship began as a teacher-student romance. Drawn together by a common interest in communist politics, a love of painting and an utmost respect for one another’s work, the pair married in 1929. Ten years later, they divorced after it was revealed that Rivera had an affair with Kahlo’s sister, Cristina. True love never fails, though, and the dynamic duo rekindled their marriage one year later. Despite being lauded as Mexico’s greatest living artist, Rivera always viewed his wife as more talented than himself. Their relationship lasted until Kahlo’s death in 1954, an event which her partner described as the most tragic moment of his life.    several titles of both artists are available at www.ftn-books.com

 

 

Posted on Leave a comment

Katharina Duwe and Johannes Duwe (1)

Because of the publication KUNST IM LANDTAG: PAARE on Katharina and Johannes Duwe I was inspired to devote a series of blogs to famous artist couples. Here is the first one. Not so famous this couple, but at the time of the publication ( available at http://www.ftn-books.com) presented as an artist couple at the DER LANDTAG venue. Of these two i have a personal preference….of these two i like Katharina over Johannes, but both have their own qualities.

Johannes Duwe was born in 1956 and was primarily inspired by the 1970s. Conceptualism is often perceived as a response to Minimalism, and the dominant art movement of the 1970s, challenging the boundaries of art with its revolutionary features. The movements that ensued were all representative of a strong desire to progress and consolidate the art world, in response to the tensions of the previous 1960s. Process art branched out from Conceptualism, featuring some of its most essential aspects, but going further in creating mysterious and experimental artistic journeys, while Land Art brought creation to the outsides, initiating early philosophies of environmentalism. In Germany, Expressive figure painting was given a second chance for the first time since the decline of Abstract Expressionism almost two decades, the genre regained its distinction through the brushstrokes of Gerhard Richter, Anselm Kiefer and Georg Baselitz. The cosmopolitan and refined position that New York city held in the 1960s remained just as influential in the 1970s. With multiple international renowned artists gravitating the galleries and downtown scene, the city once again strengthened its reputation as the artistic hub of the era. Across the globe, numerous movements defined the 1970s. Amongst others, feminism and the new radical philosophies it occasioned strongly influenced the visual culture. Photorealism, which had emerged in the 1960s, also received critical and commercial success. The critical, prominent artistic pillars of New York city started to embrace painters and sculptors from Latin America.

duwe paare