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Sam Francis (1923-1994)

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Sam Francis is a subject for a blog a long time overdue. Since i have been admiring the works by Sam Francis for many years now and of course there is a special connection with the Netherlands, because he has had many solo exhibitions in this country for over 30 years and not at the less important museums and galleries but at the very best ones. First there is of course the exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum with the beautiful Wim Crouwel designed catalogue. secondly there are the gallery exhibitions at gallery Delaive and third there is the Museum van der Togt/Cobra Museum exhibition. All of these exhibitions were accompagnied by beautiful large catalogues and available at www.ftn-books.com

My first interest in Sam Francis was raised in the early Nineties when i collected Swatch watches. Together with my brother in law we searched for the earliest of these watches and bought, collected and resiold them and one of these watches was a Christmas special by Sam Francis. We had multiple copies of this rare watch and the last one was sold some 5 years ago. Still whenever i hear the name Sam Francis i am reminded of this swatch collection. But from that time on i noticed that there is more to Sam Francis than just his Swatch watch. Just read this short biography which can be found on the Sam Francis site too:

Sam Francis (1923 – 1994) occupies a prominent position in post-war American painting. Although associated with the Abstract Expressionist movement and Clement Greenberg’s Post-Painterly Abstraction, unlike many American painters of he time he had direct and prolonged exposure to French painting and to Japanese art which had an individual impact on his work.

On leaving the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1944 owing to illness Francis took up painting as a hobby. He decided to make this a serious undertaking studying under David Park in 1947 and completed his BA and MA at the University of California. He was greatly influenced by Abstract Expressionism particularly the works of Clyfford Still and Jackson Pollock. In his use of space on the canvas to allow free circulation of strong colour and the sensitivity to light Francis developed his own style by the time his studies had ended.

Francis moved to Paris in 1950 where he met Jean-Paul Riopelle who was to remain an important influence, and study of Monet’s Waterlilies had a profound impact on his work. From a very muted palette of greys and whites he returned to the qualities of light and colour producing such works as Big Red 1953. He continues to develop the use of white space and increased the dimensions of his paintings for greater emphasis. During his period in Europe he executed a number of monumental mural paintings.

Francis returned to California in 1962 and was then influenced by the West Coast School’s preoccupation with mysticism and Eastern philosophy. Blue had become a more dominant feature of his work since 1959 inspired by personal suffering and the great joy of becoming a father for the first time in 1961. This led to combinations of hard colour and more disciplined structures with centrally placed rectangles during the 1970s. Eventually these more rigid structures gave way to looser configurations sometimes of snake-like forms with web-like patterns. Blue, sometimes brilliant, remained an important part of many later works.

The above publications and other Sam Francis publications are available at www.ftn-books.com

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MIGUEL YBÁÑEZ (1946)

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Born in Spain, but living and working for practically his entire artistic life in the Netherlands, he has managed to build a strong following of avid collectors, culminating in a Museum presentation at the Museum van der Togt.

Intense colours and bold gestures articulate Ybáñez’ paintings. Although largely communicating through abstraction, Ybáñez sometimes hints at the figurative world. However, these figurative elements have become distorted by interlacement of planes and extensive re-working of painted layers, creating complex structures and depth. The play of dimensionality is reminiscent of early Cubist painting. The Cubists, were inspired by elements of the visible world that they reduced form 3-D to 2-D, in contrast, Ybáñez creates a new dimensionality. The artist prefers innovation over conformity, therefore, to him, the tangible world has its limitations and a new visual language emerges.

Ybáñez is an intellectual with a sardonic sense of humour. Through his titles the artist enjoys creating seemingly bizarre connections. In fact, Ybáñez’s work belongs to the realm of philosophy and metaphysics, a world that defies traditional logic.

Ybáñez works in the tradition of Arte Povera and embraces a range of techniques to create works of varying scale and form. His reliefs, sculptures and assemblages are made of cloth, cardboard, metal, plaster and found objects. The resulting works are unified by an overall off-white finish which imbues the forms with a timeless and ethereal presence. In his work Ybáñez strives to negate the boundaries between past and present, ‘high’ and ‘low’ art.

The artist won numerous awards including the Premio de Dibujo, Galiana, Spain, 1979 and the Premio de Pintura Congreso de los Diputados, Madrid, Spain, 1985

www.ftn-books.com has several Ybanez titles available