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Massimo Rao

rao3

 

Just a simple title for a blog on a painter who had a very short career, but build a strong following of admirers. It was 2008 that  i visited New York and entered the CFM gallery and spoke the owner Neil Zukerman about our art collections. I learned that he had bought the very first Rao i had owned and had traded it in for the much larger IL MARINAIO CHE AVEVA ALL ‘UOVO E OLIO.

The one i originally had in my collection, was still one of the favorite paintings of Mr. Zukerman, but the encounter of this passionate collector and the story on this small Massimo Rao painting  i once owned, made the world look so very small. If he still has it….i do not know….., but in the meantime the painting in our collection is depicted in 3 Massimo Rao books and was on show at the Panorama Museum in 2004.

Since it has been quiet around Rao, no special exhibitions….. but a growing following and a special site on the painter who unfortunately died much too young ( 1950-1996), but left us so many great works of art.    http://www.massimorao.it/massimo-rao/

The books i have on Rao are growing more popular each year and it looks like most are exported to the US. So my guess is the important collectors are in the US and not in Europe.

Maybe it is an idea to organize a large retrospective in the US?

wilfried

www.ftn-books.com

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Edward Kienholz and the Beanery

Schermafbeelding 2016-08-19 om 09.40.25

At the time the Stedelijk Museum reopened again after its long time restoration, I noticed the return of one of my favorites within its collection…..the Beanery. The Beanery is a one on one replica of the local bar Kienholz visited frequently and stands out for me, because of its originality.  It is almost like a surrealist environment in which heads are replaced with clocks.

Kienholz makes environments which you can enter and experience and this Beanery from 1965 is one of his best. Because of the regular wear and tear over the years it had to be restored. There is a nice video on You Tube which gives information on the restauration and shows the importance of this Kienholz work. Lately Kienholz made another project in the Netherlands called HOERENGRACHT of which the catalogue is also available at www.ftn-books.com

 

This is the text the Stedelijk Museum published on the Beanery:

ABOUT THE BEANERY

Edward Kienholz (1927–1994) made The Beanery in 1965, basing it on his local bar, The Original Beanery on Santa Monica Boulevard in Los Angeles. It took Kienholz six months to consolidate and replicate the bar’s content in an artwork. Everything in the installation is life size: from the figures –  inspired by Kienholz’s friends and acquaintances – to the bar, bottles of beer and spirits, ash trays, cash register, telephone book, and jukebox. Even the photos on the wall duplicate those of The Original Beanery.

Remarkably, Kienholz gave each person in his bar a clock for a face, a reference to his fascination with time. Only the barman, modeled after Barney, the bar-owner at that time, has a face. Smelling and sounding like an actual bar, the installation is an evocative sensory experience that visitors are allowed to enter. The typical bar smell is characteristic for the way Kienholz work. The artist made a special recipe: the smell has to be assembled from beer, rancid fat, urine, mothballs and cigarette ash. The scent paste has been made multiple times by the restoration team of the Stedelijk Museum (the urine has been replaced by ammoniac). By coating the work with a synthetic resin the artist instills a sense of mortality and transience, which is amplified by the brown color of the interior, with its evocations of age and decay.

The Beanery is also something of a time capsule. The sign warning “faggots stay out” clearly conveys the intolerant attitudes of American society at the time, while the headlines of the 1964 newspaper in a newspaper dispenser at the door indicate that the United States is on the brink of war with Vietnam. Kienholz came up with the idea of creating his own version of the Beanery in 1958 but commenced work on August 28, 1964, upon reading the headline Children Kill Children in Vietnam Riots while visiting the real bar. The harsh contrast between the “real time” represented by the newspaper headline and the “surreal time” of the bar’s customers impelled Kienholz to start work on the tableau.

wilfried

www.ftn-books.com

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Günter Tuzina …not a minimal artist, but minimalistic art.

 

tuzina word a

The second time i met Günter Tuzina was with his exhibition in 1992 in The Haags Gemeentemuseum and noticed that he still followed his own artistic path. Making variations on his windows with crossed lines in color schemes which were very recognizable and typical for the works by Tuzina. At the time Tuzina executed a walldrawing for one of the staircases in the Gemeentmuseum which is beside the LeWitt, Toroni and Forg staircase drawings still on show. I think Tuzina is one of those artists you can see work of and immediately know it is by Tuzina. A few years ago i was impressed by a work which was for sale at Christie’s but unfortunately it was out of my budget and sold for twice+ the estimation, but one can get lucky too, because a little before that i noticed these 2 beautiful drawings on the local book market, which were made in a series of 55 for the Bebert publishing house. Both are signed and numbered and all the drawing on each of them is done by hand and all have a different background color. These are from the same edition of 55 copies but the background colors vary and therefore these are unique and…..these beauties are now for sale at

www.ftn-books.com

It is hard to find good publications on this artist but ftn-books also has some nice titles available.

wilfried

 

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Museum Belvedere on a rainy day and found Gerrit Benner

 

Gerrit Benner…. his native country is Friesland in the Netherlands. Benner has become famous for use of bold colors in an abstract setting but somehow he managed to combine these colors into landscapes .  I had the chance to take some photographs from very close up and noticed, when seen on a distance of only a few inches, that it is pure abstraction. Further away you can see skies and meadows and the abstraction becomes a landscape. Benner is a master in combining these brushstrokes and blend them into a (little) recognizable subject.

Museum Belvedere is worth a visit. Not only because of its collection, but also for its location. A dark, low museum building within a landscape of water , meadows and skies….. a little bit like a Benner landscape.

 

wilfried

www.ftn-books.com has ao the following titles available:

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Gardens to visit… Monet at Giverny

Because we will visit the private garden of Piet Oudolf in a few days i remembered our visits of the Gardens of Claude Monet in Giverny ( France ). The first time was a few weeks after they opened and we almost had the garden to ourselves. It was impressive to walk through the house , see the japanese prints, furniture and the extremely large studio which was used by Monet to paint his almost abstract scenes of his gardens. Mainly this studio felt like you stepped back in time and could envision how it must have been at the time Monet was working there. These super large paintings now are in the Orangerie in Paris and it was a “must see” for me and my son when we visited Paris a few years ago. We only stayed a 2o minutes in the Orangerie……Lucas did not like it… but…….now several years later he still remembers these impressive paintings. So a fine reason to visit the gardens in Giverny for as second time again some 2 years ago.

What was there to be seen in Giverny… busses, long rows of waiting people to get entrance, too many people on a limited space. Studio no longer open to the public and a disappointing visit because of the very large crowds that came to visit from all over the world. Better avoid these gardens now and go straight to Paris and visit the Orangerie instead….even better….travel 500 miles and visit the Beyeler Museum in Basel and visit one of the most beautiful museums and collections in the world. Building by Renzo Piano and collection by Beyeler, the one time art dealer who collected an extraordinary collection of contemporary art including one of the large Monet garden paintings from his Giverny series.

So looking forward to the garden architecture of Piet Oudolf in a few days i had to share this and of course there are still extremely nice books on these Monet gardens to be found. see also www.ftn-books.com

monet abradale

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Agnes Martin and Thomas Ammann

Agnes Martin has become one of the greats in Modern Art from the last Fifty years. In 1977 the Stedelijk Museum published an excellent catalogue in which the quality of painting was obvious. Beautiful and impressive design by Wim Crouwel and one that is in worldwide demand because of its design and subject. Since then many catalogues were published on Martin but 2 stand out. The first is the one which was published for the Agnes Martin exhibition in the Josef Albers Museum / Quadrat Bottrop. The catalogue was published in such an excellent way that i had to have one myself for my own collection. The poster is even more special because it is an original silkscreen print in such delicate colour scheme that it reflects in the best way the quality of the work by Agnes Martin. The final book i would like to tell about is the Thomas Ammann  Fine Art catalogue they published in 2008. Large sized book with excellent printing and impressive paintings by Martin. Buy these three titles at www.ftn-books.com and  do not forget to take a look at the impressive poster made for the Quadrat exhibition when i will list this later this month at www.ftn-books.com.