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A nice special comparison between Vincent van Gogh and Arman

At the gallery Marianne & Pierre Nahon,  Arman presented his series that he made while inspired by one of the most famous Vincent van Gogh paintings LA NUIT ETOILEE.  A painting that inspired other artists too.

For instance Don McLean made his Starry Starry Night as . a tribute to this painting and the life of Vincent van Gogh.

But Arman took his inspiration not from the music but from the composition, colors and the swirl of the paint. The series is fantastic and shows the strength of Arman. He mixes his personal style with that of van Gogh. The catalogue from 1994 is now available at www.ftn-books.com together with many other Arman publications.

arman nuit

 

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Douwe Jan Bakker (1943-1997)

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( no portrait found)

The first time i heard of Douwe Jan Bakker  was the time Hans Locher mentioned Bakker to have an exhibition in the Gemeentemuseum. I did not know the artist at that time but soon would learn that he was and is one of the leading conceptual artists. The iedea behind the work is more important than the execution of it. Because another exhibition was cancelled. The Gemeentemuseum organized, before their renovation closure, the Retrospektive exhibition which was long time due. Douwe Jan Bakker did not have many of these exhibitions but this one was  a necessary one and fortunately just in time because soon after, Douwe Jan Bakker died ( 1997). There are not many publications on Douwe Jan Bakker published, but www.ftn-books.com has two important ones for sale. The first is from the Gemeentemuseum (1996) and the second one from the Centraal Museum (1977). Artistically and from a art historian point of view important publications.

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Egon Schiele …The Self portraits

 

Yesterdays blog inspired me to write a blog on the self portraits of Egon Schiele. Schiele himself was his most reliable model and in the short period he made his art he always made studies of himself and really stroke a pose.  Studies of his head and studies of full length figures all show the different poses he took. In many of these studies/portraits his head or body is distorted in some way making the pose exceptional and really typical for Egon Schiele. Some of these selfportraits are available through www.ftn-books.com. I bought these at the time there was a “Schiele Klimt Klee” exhibition at the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag and these prints were made according to the highest standards by the printshop of the Gemeentemuseum. Best of all …their size is 1 on 1 with the original drawing which makes the print almost perfect.

 

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Roy Villevoy (1960)

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Roy Villevoy, at one time he was one of the artist who’s name was mentioned by everybody in the art world in the Netherlands. A little like Rob Birza and Marien Schouten, but that was in the late Eighties and early Nineties, but since it has become a little quiet with Roy Villevoy. This is/was my personal idea.  Yes, i know he has had his exhibitions in the Netherlands and elsewhere ( Frankfurt catalogue is available at www.ftn-books.com). But i am wrong.  Villevoy has been active all these years and i was pleasantly surprised to learn of his solo exhibitions. So for those who missed Villevoy too. Here is the list with his solo exhibitions as found on his site www.royvillevoye.com and the VIllevoy Hollandse Meesters documentary on Youtube:

 

Selected solo exhibitions

2018 (upcoming) Unseen, Eenwerk, Westergasfabriek, Amsterdam, NL

2017 Evidence, Jan Dietvorst & Roy Villevoye, (*) Argos, Brussels, BE

2016 Eró (Preparing the Memorial Carving for Omomá), Brummelkamp gallery, AMC, Amsterdam, NL

2013 People in the Woods, Motive Gallery, Brussels, BE

2013 Tí, Koos Breukel & Roy Villevoye, Foam, Amsterdam, NL

2013 Black Box, (*), Argos, Brussels, BE

2012 Unseen, Westergasfabriek, Tí, Koos Breukel & Roy Villevoye, Motive Gallery / Willem van Zoetendael, Amsterdam, NL

2011 Jack and the Outskirts, Galerie Martinethibaultdelachâtre, Paris, FR

2011 Johan Grimonprez | It’s a Poor Sort of Memory that Only Works Backwards:

          On Zapping, Close Encounters and the Commercial Break, special guest: Roy Villevoye, SMAK, Gent, BE

2011 The Histories, Motive Gallery, Amsterdam, NL

2010 Preparations, Museum De Lakenhal, Leiden, NL

2010 Madonna, (after Omomá and Céline), KIT, Amsterdam, NL

2009 Omomá, Galerie Martinethibaultdelachâtre, Paris, FR

2008 Detours, Films, Photographic Works, Installations (including collaborations with Jan Dietvorst), (*),
         Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, NL

2007 Black Box, Argos, Brussels, BE

2006 Propeller, Art Gallery of the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, US

2005 Propeller, The Photographer’s Gallery, London, UK

2005 Les Néerlandais Voyageurs, Trois expositions d’artistes néerlandais inspirés des cultures lointaines:
         (Ed van der Elsken, Roy Villevoye, Heringa/van Kalsbeek), Institut Néerlandais, Paris, FR

2004 Propeller, De Hallen, Haarlem, NL

2003 ‘At night we slept in the middle of the clouds. That was difficult. So they told me.’ (*), De Beyerd, Breda, NL

2002 Books and Prints, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, Amsterdam, NL

2002 Cinema (*), De Appel, Amsterdam, NL

2002 ‘Wat heb je daar dan gegeten?’, Steendrukkerij Amsterdam, NL

2001 Hunting and Gathering, Galerie Fons Welters, Amsterdam, NL

2001 Rood katoen / Red Calico, semi-permanent project, Rijksmuseum voor Volkenkunde, Leiden, NL

2000 My Bonnie Is Over The Ocean…, Stedelijk Museum Het Domein, Sittard, NL

1999 Passing Time, Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam, Amsterdam, NL

1997 Returning, Galerie Fons Welters, Amsterdam, NL

1990 Spatie, Schilderijen / Paintings 1988-1990, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, NL

1987 Recent Werk, Bonnefantenmuseum, Maastricht, NL

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Sidi El Karchi (1975) …Intriguing Portraits

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If there is one portraits painter in the Netherlands it must be Sidi El Karchi. His portraits can be recognized immediately. A little like the portraits by Rosemin Hendriks are also highly recognizable, But dthe difference is that where Hendriks uses the outline of a portrait to emphasize details, El Karchi uses colors, many many colors, but these colors have such an impact that they become part of the portrait and emphasize parts in the portrait, . Hair, glasses a puppy all draw your attention because of their colors. I really like his portraits and am looking for one for our collection. I must be patient. The artist is still young and it probably will take another decade before his works will show up at auction. For the moment i can look into the 2 books that i have on El Karchi and which are available at www.ftn-books.com

PS.. i see some resemblance in these portraits of these artists is Sidi El Karchi perhaps a Schiele admirer?

 

 

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Robert Jacobsen at Galerie Asbaek / 1976

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The year 1976. The exhibition …Robert Jacobsen at gallery Asbaek. This catalogue i found some weeks ago and knew instantly that this was one of the most important Jacobsen catalogues. Only a few color illustration, the rest black and white, but all the works powerfull and form his most important periods. The portrait shows a happy and confident artist who knows that his works are important.

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jacobsen asbaek c

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The catalogue itself has . Plain cartonboard cover with the initials of Robert Jacobsen printed upon. A weak black paper spine completes this simple but effective and highly important little book which is now for sale at www.ftn-books.com  together with some other Jacobsen publications.

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Rosalind Fox Solomon (1930)

 

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Sometimes you can not place it immediately, but because i value some publishers more than others, my eye was caught by a book titled Chapalingas by Steidl publishers. Because i know they have an excellent portfolio of publications and produce the best possible (quality) books i started to leaf through it. The photographer was Rosalind Solomon. Years ago i  had read that she photographed the youth in Belfast and at a time went back to one of the concentration camps, but i had forgotten her name….until yesterday i encountered the Steidl publication “Chapalingas” by her and was blown away by her photographs.

here follows a short biography on Solomon.

Rosalind Fox Solomon (b. 1930), an American artist based in New York City, is celebrated for her portraits and for her connection to human suffering, ritual, survival, and struggle.  Fox Solomon’s work flows back and forth between the personal and the universal.  Her talent lies in her capacity to interpret and photograph both the social elements of the places she travels to, and the obsessions and anxieties that travel with her.  Her primary medium has been photography.  In the 1980s, she also produced the installations, Adios and Catacombs.  Since the 1990s, she has continued making images.  Additionally, she has performed her own texts and poetry on video.  Bruce Silverstein exhibited her audiovisual installation, Scintillation, in her 2016 solo show Got to Go, which also featured 30 prints of varied sizes, hung in erratic salon style.  For the past 45 years, Fox Solomon has created challenging bodies of work, shown in nearly 30 solo exhibitions and 100 group exhibitions, and in the collections of over 50 museums worldwide.

Born in Highland Park, Illinois, Fox Solomon graduated from Goucher College.  She married, moved to Chattanooga, Tennessee, and raised two children.  She began photographing in 1968, continuing to live and work in the South until she moved in 1977 to Washington, D.C.  Solomon studied privately with Lisette Model during visits to New York City.

In the 1970’s, Fox Solomon began her work with dolls and manikins, portraits and ritual.  She made her first portraits of the ill during a yearlong project in a Chattanooga hospital.  In Guatemala, she photographed shamans as well as secular and religious ritual.  She also worked on a series of southern portraits, which include President Jimmy Carter and William Eggleston.  From 1977–79, Fox Solomon continued photographing artists and politicians, among them Louise Nevelson, Eva Le Gallienne, William Christenberry, and Tony Smith.  Her project, Outside the White House, was completed during two years in Washington, D. C., when her husband was Administrator of the General Services Administration.

John Szarkowski included her work in the 1978 exhibition Mirrors and Windows at the Museum of Modern Art, and exhibited examples from her Dolls and Manikins series in the show Photography for Collectors. Szarkowski also selected 50 of Fox Solomon’s prints for MoMA’s permanent collection.  Her pictures have appeared over the years in group exhibitions at MoMA: American Children, American Politicians, Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography and The Original Copy: Sculpture in Photography 1839 to Today.  In 1986, MoMA mounted a solo exhibition of Fox Solomon’s work, Rosalind Solomon, Ritual.  Most recently, MoMA included her work in the anthology Photography at MoMA: 1960—Now, and curator Peter Eleey devoted a room to a selection of her work at MoMA PS1 in the Greater New York 2015 exhibition.

In the 1980’s, she photographed in Ancash, a region in the Peruvian Andes.  The remnants of a catastrophic earthquake became a metaphor for the upheaval she was experiencing in her own life.  A Guggenheim Fellowship supported this work, which was recognized as an historic document of a forgotten area when it was exhibited at el Museo de Arte de Lima in 1996.  She continued her work in the area, over the next 20 years.  During the 1980’s, Solomon also spent six months in India, as a Fellow of the American Institute of Indian Studies.  In Kolkata, she photographed sculptures of mother goddess figures that radiate female power.  She also photographed Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, the Dalai Lama, Ganesh Pyne, and Satyajit Ray.

Along the Road, made in 1985, is one of several single-edition handmade books by Fox Solomon.  It includes photographs, drawings, texts and a Tibetan Buddhist woman’s apron.

In 1987, hundreds of young men and women dying with AIDS were demonized by society; often ostracized even by their own families.  Fox Solomon felt affinity with them.  Her own son was living with a progressive kidney disease.  She began making portraits of individuals with AIDS, hoping that her pictures might help to remove the stigma attached to those with HIV who were sick and dying.

Tom Sokolowski, director of New York University’s Grey Gallery of Art, heard about her project.  He had seen her pictures at MoMA, and asked her whether she could complete the work and make prints for an exhibition to open in May 1988.  Ten months later, sixty-five of the resulting pictures were mounted for the exhibit, Portraits in the Time of AIDS at the Grey Gallery.  Twenty-six of the original large-scale prints were shown again in 2013 at Bruce Silverstein gallery in New York City, and again in the Salon d’Honneur of the Grand Palais at Paris Photo in 2015.

As ethnic violence increased throughout the world, Fox Solomon went to Poland to revisit the Holocaust and photograph the people she encountered.  She photographed Belfast children of The Troubles; the wounded of Belgrade, Hanoi and Phnom Penh; and the oppressed and the privileged of South Africa.  For respite and contrast, she photographed New Orleans Mardi Gras.  In 2006, Steidl published her book, Polish Shadow.

The book CHAPALINGAS  is now available at www.ftn-books.com

rosalind solomon

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Kenneth Martin (1905-1984)

 

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Kenneth Martin was for me one of the grand old masters of Constructivism. Outside England hardly known, but considered by many of great influence and importance. His best works for me are his prints in which he excels. His wife Mary was a gifted artist too and from both www.ftn-books.com has some nice publications. I only know of one exhibition outside Great Britain, which is the Bottrop exhibition but when you see one announced , i strongly recommend a visit to discover yourself the importance of Kenneth Martin.

 

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Francois Morellet (1926-2016) and the van Abbemuseum catalogue from 1971

 

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Several reasons why this catalogue is importand. First of all …this is one of the first Morellet catalogues published outside France. In 1971 Morellet was invited for a LICHTKUNST exhibition at the van Abbemuseum and Jan van Toorn was commissioned to design the catalogue with this exhibition. van Toorn decided for the Local printer LECTURIS ( still one of the very best printers in the Netherlands) and included within the catalogue multiple special prints after the large silkscreens by Morellet.

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Making it this way more like an artist book than a simple exhibition catalogue. This made the book so special that it is arguably the best catalogue ever published with the works by Morellet.

 

Since, Morellet is one of the most appreciated and valued artist in the Kinetic and Minimal Art scenes and the catalogue is one which is sought after and collected by many admirers. The catalogue is available at www.ftn-books.com:

https://ftn-books.com/products/abbemuseum-francois-morellet-1971-nm

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Deweer Art gallery in Ottegem since 1979

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Some of the galleries are out there for ages. For example Denise Rene in Paris and Willy Schoots in Antwerp but there is also Deweer gallery who have a presence in the gallery world since 1979. When you visit the gallery it is more like a small sized museum than a typical gallery. A huge surface, situated in an old factory with separate rooms, make it suitable to present a diversified collection. Artists from the gallery range from Jan Fabre to Mark Wallinger. www.ftn-books.com carries some sold out Deweer publications from the last decades.

The Deweer site gives the following information on the history of the gallery:

Deweer Gallery (est. 1979) is a leading second-generation gallery specialized in national and international contemporary art. Gerald and Bart Deweer are its owners and directors. The gallery is located in a building with approximately 1,200 m² of exhibition spaces in the rural town of Otegem, in Belgium. Deweer Gallery, representing more than twenty artists, focuses exclusively on work that evinces a combination of critical and poetic qualities. Well-known for its representation of artists such as Stephan Balkenhol, Jan Fabre, Günther Förg, Ilya and Emilia Kabakov and Panamarenko, the gallery has a reputation for building artists. Deweer Gallery has been working together with these artists for more than two/three decades. The early detection of talent is its trademark. It is evident in, among other things, their current supporting of artists such as Melissa Gordon, George Little, Enrique Marty, Benjamin Moravec, Nasan Tur, Anna Vogel and Andy Wauman.

HISTORY

From father to sons

Mark Deweer’s passion for collecting art led to the creation of Deweer Gallery in 1979. Mark was the driving force and the initiator. His nose for artistic talent and his business acumen, along with the unconditional support of his wife Marleen Deweer, made for an ideal combination that would make the realization of his dream possible.

Raised surrounded by art, their two sons, Gerald and Bart Deweer, know the world of art from within. Gradually, they took over the management of the gallery. Gerald and Bart want the gallery to continue to play a dynamic, ambitious and leading role on the international contemporary art scene. They aim to continue to promote artists on the basis of strong internal/external exhibitions and participations in international art fairs such as Art Cologne (since 1995), ARCO Madrid (since 2001) and recently also miart (Fiera Milano).

Building

Since the middle of the 1980s, Deweer Gallery is located in an unusually spacious building that once housed a small industrial enterprise. In 2011-2012, the spaces of the gallery were thoroughly renovated. Far-reaching architectural interventions were carried out, such as a doubling of the publicly accessible spaces (the lobby and three exhibition rooms) to a total area of approximately 1200m². In September 2012, the new gallery opened with the group exhibition ‘Re-Opening’, which clearly showcased the rejuvenation and renewal of the gallery program.